Tour These Curiosities

$25,000 Room
The $25,000 Storeroom which displays many of the fine artisan windows Mrs. Winchester purchased during her lifetime. At the time of her death in 1922, the windows were valued at $25,000 (about $350,000 in today’s dollars) and are understood to be worth in the millions now.
Seen on: Mansion Tour & Explore More Tour

Séance Room
Séance Room is located near the center of the house and, per legend, this is where Mrs. Winchester came nightly to communicate with the spirits and receive instructions for designing her house. Mrs. Winchester carried the only key to this room which features only one entrance, but three exits.
Seen on: Mansion Tour & Explore More Tour

Daisy Bedroom
Located in the front portion of the house, the Daisy Bedroom is noted for the daisy motif highlighted in its stained-glass windows. It’s also where, per servant stories, that Mrs. Winchester was trapped during the great San Francisco earthquake of 1906, resulting in the collapse of several cupolas and the home’s original seven-story Observation Tower.
Seen on: Mansion Tour & Explore More Tour

Sarah’s Bedroom
This very bedroom is where Mrs. Winchester passed away in 1922. With its creamy Lincrusta wallpaper, ornate fireplace and windows overlooking the central garden, it’s little wonder Mrs. Winchester would find solace and repose in such a tranquil setting.
Seen on: Mansion Tour & Explore More Tour

Grand Ballroom
The elegant Grand Ballroom was built almost entirely without nails! It cost over $9,000 at the time (about $125,600 in today’s currency) when an entire house in the 1880s to early 1900s could be built for less than $1,000. The exquisite ballroom features walls and a parquet floor made of six hardwoods – mahogany, teak, maple, rosewood, oak, and white ash.
Seen on: Mansion Tour & Explore More Tour

Crystal Bedroom
This bedroom has not been seen on tours in many decades to help slow the deterioration of its walls and ceiling. It’s called the Crystal Bedroom because of the wallpaper, which was heavily flocked and encrusted with crushed mica, a mineral that reflects the light and causes the paper to sparkle when the light hits it.
Seen on: Explore More Tour

Corridors of the Third Floor
The corridors of the third floor are avoided by many Tour Guides after darkness falls. Some have heard footsteps coming down the hallway, when there is no one there. Others have heard their names whispered by disembodied voices. This area has never been open to the public before.
Seen on: Explore More Tour

Witch’s Cap
This is one of the most unusual spaces in the mansion. It has not been determined what this area was meant to be utilized for, it is suspected as simply attic space. It has an interesting feature: a weird acoustic effect that’s due to its conical ceiling—if you stand in the center and speak, the sound will seem to surround you as it bounces back. This area has never been open to the public before.
Seen on: Explore More Tour

Third-Floor Base of Observation Tower
Before 1906, this wing of the house stood four floors higher than it does today – it reached its full height of seven stories. Here you’ll stand where the seven-story Observation Tower collapsed during the great San Francisco earthquake of 1906. This area has never been open to the public before.
Seen on: Explore More Tour

Next: Mysteries